Pet Insurance a Must as News Breaks that Vets Fees Now Stand at Over £800 for Uninsured Animals

Pet Insurance a Must as News Breaks that Vets Fees Now Stand at Over £800 for Uninsured Animals

- in News, Pet Insurance

For those of you who haven’t got a pet insurance policy you may wish to alter that status quo quickly on learning that here in the UK the average vets fees for uninsured pets now stands at over £800; with some specialist treatments costing pet owners who haven’t previously arranged cover up to £8,000. Pet insurance provider, More Than and policy comparison website, MoneySuperMarket recently revealed claims data which threw light on a range of stats which many pet lovers might not have been aware of. For example during 2015 the most prevalent claim regarding pet insurance centred on joint problems experienced by our best furry friends, with an average of £452 spent on treatment to tackle related issues.

After joint treatment, vet consultations leading to prescribed treatment for growths and tumours represented the next most common pet insurance policy claim in the course of the last 12 months, with an average  figure of £433 being  widely mooted. Skin conditions accounts for the third most recurrent claim trigger, with owners generally looking at making claims said to be in the region of £204. In terms of the costliest pet insurance claim, and fractures came out on top, with claims processed on average calculated at some £809, whilst spinal treatment injuries were classed as the second most expensive claims type last year according to www.thisismoney.co.uk. Head and/or facial injury procedures and treatments came next on this particular list of costliest pet insurance claims acknowledged, with a price tag of £669 being generally recognised as an average.

Average Pet Insurance Policies Amount to £260 According to Latest Research, Representing Good Value in Contrast to Escalating Treatment Bills from Vets

Another fact which will be best described as alarming rather than interesting as the abovementioned one is the underlying one which readily suggests that as much as 56% of dog and cat owners fail to take out insurance cover specifically for their pets; which subsequently sees them forking out for substantial bills each time they’re forced to attend the vets. Returning to the figures being bandied around about average vet’s fees, it would therefore make an annual pet policy of around £261 (as being broadly quoted by the aforementioned pet insurance premium aggregator site) as something of a snip by comparison. Of course, various factors influence just how much pseudo-policyholders are likely to pay, with an animal’s age, breed and medical history to date being vitally important criteria to most insurance providers from the outset of any discussions/applicative process.

It may not surprise many people to discover that as a general rule of thumb, crossbreeds tend to work out cheaper to insure than pedigree dogs (around 20% less so according to the study), while non-pedigree cats are found to be around 11% cheaper than their more esteemed peers. The survey also established that the majority of pet insurance providers will refuse to cover animals which have pre-existing health and medical conditions, or for that matter any illnesses which they’ve received treatment for previously. The research also underlined that pet insurers have made a habit of hiking up premium prices once a current policy expires in recent times, with 2015’s rise in Insurance Premium Tax rates considered pivotal to this trend.

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